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Friends of the Armstrong Library

Christmas Tour of Natchez Homes 2018


2 - 5 pm on Sunday, December 2

$20 ticket for all 3 homes

Tickets can be purchased at:

  • The Armstrong Library
  • The Visitors Center
  • Any of the locations on the day of the Tour

Featured Homes

Merrill House

Casey Mallory House

LeMay Home

Click for Google Map to the houses  (Look for the blue houses)

Click on any house picture for a larger view.

Merrill House












Merrill House

311 South Commerce Street
Home of Gwen & David Ball

The Merrill House was built by James Carradine, a wealthy merchant. The Natchez Democrat reported in September 1869, that “flames were seen issuing from the roof “of the Carradine residence. Despite the efforts of the firemen, hampered by a rotted hose, the residence was totally consumed. By October 1870, Carradine completely rebuilt his residence, but in the fashionable Italianate style.

Despite later reversals of fortune, the Carradine family held onto the house until it became home to Ella Brandon Stanton. She grew up at Brandon Hall and operated a boarding house in the Carradine’s former home. The 1900 census lists 19 people as residents of the house, including her daughter Charlotte Merrill and Charlotte’s two children, Dunbar Merrill and Aaron Stanton Merrill. The Stanton/Merrill family owned the house for almost a century, and it became known as the Merrill House.

A noted war hero, Admiral Aaron Stanton “Tip” Merrill (1890-1961), graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1912. He served in both World Wars and received numerous honors. Merrill and his wife Louise returned to Natchez, where he eventually became the President of the Jefferson Military College, now known as Jefferson College. They entertained many distinguished guests, including John Wayne and General Douglas MacArthur.

The current owners, Gwen and David Ball, completed extensive renovations on the Merrill House in 2001. The formal rooms feature American Classical furniture, ca. 1810-1840 by renowned cabinetmakers, including Duncan Phyfe and Anthony Quervelle.    

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Casey Mallory House









Casey Mallory House

403 Franklin Street
Home of James Wade

 This townhouse was built in 1850 for druggist Casey Mallory and his wife Margaret Yale Mallory. His business was likely located on the ground floor while his family lived above. The Greek Revival building is the grandest still existing townhouse built on a commercial site in historic downtown Natchez. The high quality of brickwork – similar to Melrose and the Dr Dubs Townhouse – is attributed to James Fox, a Philadelphia mason. Though made locally, the brick is called “Philadelphia pressed brick”. The ironwork on the steps leading to the front door is original.

After the death of the Mallorys, their son William inherited the building but lost it after defaulting on the mortgage. During its subsequent ownership by the inter-related Britton, Wheeler, and Davis families, the building was occupied by the Prentiss Club and the Chamber of Commerce. In 1918, merchant Jonathan Seiferth acquired the property and added a three story front for additional office space. The original facade was simply covered over. During the 1940s, the building was home to Day’s Cleaners and the Medical Surgical and Dental Clinic of doctors Gaudet, Whittington, and Geisenberger.

The added facade was in poor condition by the 1990s even though the main structure remained stable. In 1998, the building was substantially damaged by straight line winds and eventually ended up in foreclosure again. Brad Lemay initiated the restoration of the property in the 2010s. Removal of the old facade revealed the original facade still in place. James Wade purchased the building in 2015 for his residence and has completed the restoration.    

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LeMay Home











LeMay Home

700 Orleans Street
Home of Dori & Brad LeMay

This lovely Queen Anne was built between 1872 and 1878 by Frank Arrighi, who was born in Natchez to immigrant parents, an Italian father and Irish mother. One of the most prominent citizens of the period, Arrighi had served as a captain in the 16th Mississippi Infantry under General Ewell and Stonewall Jackson. He saw action in almost all of the major campaigns of the Civil War, was wounded three separate times, and was subsequently taken as a prisoner of war in 1864. After his release, he returned to Natchez and married Mathilda Hughes.

He was elected City Tax Assessor and Collector, a post he held for thirty-one years.  No one ever ran against him due to his immense popularity. When he resigned, it was against the protests of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. Arrighi was a man of some wealth and invested his money in numerous local enterprises. According to his obituary, he rarely sold a piece of property for delinquent tax and frequently paid the tax himself for a large number of tax payers who were unable to meet the taxes. The obituary also stated that merchants of Natchez closed their doors during the hour of his funeral. He has a beautiful monument in the Natchez City Cemetery to “Beloved Father”.

His Orleans Street home is a fine example of the Queen Anne style with Steamboat Revival millwork. It is particularly known for its elaborately decorated ceilings and accents. The LeMays purchased and restored the home in 2011. They have furnished the house with art and antiques from around the world; including American, French, and Imperial Russian neoclassical pieces.  

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